Thoughts and Ramblings

General things I find of interest.

What Objective-C can learn from Java, Part 3 (Single Source File)

This is the third is a series of blog posts I’m writing on things that Objective-C can learn from Java. The other parts can be found here: Part 1 (Generics) Part 2 (Abstract Classes) Part 3 (Single Source File) Part 4 (Namespace) Part 5 (Exceptions) Objective-C still retains a lot of its heritage from it’s C beginnings. This includes using two files, a header and a source file, for each class.

What Objective-C can learn from Java, Part 2 (Abstract Classes)

This is the second is a series of blog posts I’m writing on things that Objective-C can learn from Java. The other parts can be found here: Part 1 (Generics) Part 2 (Abstract Classes) Part 3 (Single Source File) Part 4 (Namespace) Part 5 (Exceptions) When one is using object oriented design, a common practice is to lump similar classes together with a common super-class and include the common functionality in that super-class.

What Objective-C can learn from Java, Part 1 (Generics)

This is the first is a series of blog posts I’m going to write over the next several days on things that Objective-C can learn from Java. I’ve been programming in Java since 1997, and in Objective-C since 2001. The two languages have a lot of similarities, but there are a few design principles in which Java excels and Objective-C is left behind. This is understandable considering that Objective-C is older than Java, and Java borrowed heavily from Objective-C when it was designed.

Trac.fcgi Memory Usage

I’ve been slowly transitioning to using nginx as the web front-end in an effort to reduce Apache’s memory usage. In keeping with this task, I’m moving more and more off of Apache. One piece I recently moved was trac, transitioning to using it directly by nginx by running it in fast-cgi mode where as previously it was running as cgi though Apache. While fast-cgi is faster, it has inherent issues, such as any memory leak can result in ever growing memory usage, which is exactly why Apache has a setting for each child to serve a limited number of requests before exiting.

Google Link Redirection (cont.)

Earlier I wrote about google’s link redirection. I have finally finished my testing of a Safari extension which kills this behavior. I didn’t want to release this extension until the updating mechanism worked and that is what took me so long. Anyway, here is the the extension. Enjoy, and let me know what you think.